Top Tip: Cover your eyepiece, arggghh.


Long exposure photography is awesome; being able to shoot long exposures during the day with help from a set of ND filters is even more awesome. But if you’re shooting long exposures with a DSLR camera, there’s an important point you need to remember. (Mirrorless camera users, you don’t need to worry about this, but please do share the knowledge with your DSLR-wielding friends.) 

You need to cover your camera’s eyepiece.

Despite being pretty well sealed, if you have a bright light (such as the sun) shining into the camera’s viewfinder, you may find yourself seeing weird flare or a washed out look on your photos. It’s the digital equivalent of a light leak: light reaches the sensor via the viewfinder and over-exposes your photos.

Left: Eyepiece open - Look at that terrible flare! Right: Eyepiece closed - Flare be gone. 30 second exposure, the only change here is the eyepiece being opened and closed.

Left: Eyepiece open - Look at that terrible flare!
Right: Eyepiece closed - Flare be gone.

30 second exposure, the only change here is the eyepiece being opened and closed.

By covering your viewfinder you can prevent any stray light entering your camera and hitting the sensor. This should eliminate instances of nasty flare or washed out exposures.

There are plenty of options when it comes to covering your viewfinder. Some cameras have an accessory that you can attach to your camera strap that you then clip over your viewfinder when you need to. Other cameras come with a curtain that you can draw over the viewfinder using a switch beside it. Or you could use a piece of cloth, card, or even your hand.

Some of the Nikon cameras have a handy eyepiece cover built into the viewfinder. Other cameras have a cover that attaches to the strap.

Some of the Nikon cameras have a handy eyepiece cover built into the viewfinder. Other cameras have a cover that attaches to the strap.


Share your shots with us!

As always, we'd love to see what you guys come up with. If you use this handy technique, we'd love to see your shots! Well, even if you don't we'd still like to see your shots! You can tag us #Triggertrap and @Triggertrap on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook. Don't forget you can also add your photos to the Triggertrap pool on Flickr.

 

 

Comment